Tag Archives: Lagos

Two Hearts

“Eko Idumota, Eko Idumota!!! Mi ò ní change o, wölé pèlú change ë. I no get change, I dey talk my own now oh.”

Adeola froze when she heard the voice. She was on her way to the market to buy black clothes for her mother. Her mother had never liked the colour black as she associated it with death.

Growing up, Adeola had been warned many times by her mother against wearing black. Her mother was of the belief that the colour was a bad omen and attracted evil. She and her mum always had a running battle over this, as Adeola loved the colour black. She sometimes dressed in all black while she was in the university and was unbothered by the strange looks she sometimes got.

Her mother who never wore black was now forced to wear it. Her husband’s body was lying cold in the mortuary and tradition expected that she was garbed in the colour black.

******

“Aunty, comot for road if you no dey go make another person enter my moto jo. Eko Idumota!!!” The voice boomed above the other voices shouting their various destinations. A passenger trying to get into the bus shoved Adeola to the side and she turned.

Their eyes met. Shock registered boldly on their faces and they stared at each other.

“Eko….” He stopped mid-sentence; his eyes locked on hers. The bus was about moving and she flagged it to stop.

“O n wölé.” The conductor shouted and the bus halted.

Adeola entered the bus as she continued to stare at the conductor.

The conductor was speechless as he also couldn’t take his eyes off Adeola.

“Bèrè sí gba owó mí o.” The driver shouted at the conductor.

The conductor began to collect the fares from the passengers. Adeola stretched a two hundred note to him but he refused to collect it.

“Collect your money, Deolu.” Adeola said.

Deolu ignored her as he turned his back to her.

“Deolu!” Adeola called out again.

Deolu burst out into tears. He began to wipe off his tears with his hands, embarrassed by his sudden breakdown in the presence of strangers.

“Ahn…ahn, wetin happen?” One of the passengers sitting beside Adeola asked.

“Wetin you tell am wey he dey cry?” Another asked.

Another passenger looked at Adeola and looked at the conductor. She opened her mouth wide and exclaimed. “Olúwa ò.”

“Wetin dey happen for dia? Kí ló dé?” The driver shouted. He took his eyes off the road briefly. “S’ó ò lè sòrò ni? Mo ní kí n ló sëlè níbè yën?”

“Driver, take am easy oh. You no look the face of your conductor and this girl.” Another passenger said.

“Wetin do dia face wey I go dey look am?”

“E be like dem be family?”

“So how that one take consine me?” The driver snorted. “Me I no get family too?”

“Driver, ó wà o.” Adeola said. She turned to Deolu. “Daddy is dead, you can come home now. The burial is next Thursday.”

Deolu shook his head as his tears flowed freely down his cheeks.

Adeola touched her twin brother’s shoulders as she made an attempt to alight from the bus. “Please come home. Maami’s heart has been broken since you left. Don’t let her die without knowing you are still alive. Please!” Adeola pleaded.

Deolu nodded as his sister alighted and watched the bus zoom off  to its destination.

——
Photo Credit: https://www.vectorstock.com

Are we mentally aware?

“Aunty, I took care of your car while you were away”. The man said.

I looked at him briefly and ignored him.

“You have a nice car and you are very pretty.”

I tapped the unlock button on the car remote once and eased in. I locked the door and started the car.

“Aunty I just need hundred naira.” He said through the wound-up window. “Please Aunty….” He kept saying as I drove off.

*****

This is the fourth time this well spoken man probably in his late 40s or early 50s would be accosting me. He walks the length and breadth of the popular streets in Surulere every day. The first time he accosted me, I did not realize he had a problem. As I eased into the marwa that was to take me to my destination at about 6:15a.m, he walked up to me and complimented my hair. I had packed it all up and it fell like the leaves of a palm tree around my head.

“Aunty, I like the way you packed your hair. It makes you look like an African beauty.”

“Thank you.” I had replied as I looked away and hoped the marwa would fill up on time so we could move. I was already running late and not in the mood for any chit-chat with anyone early in the morning.

“I just need hundred naira, please.” He had asked.

It was at that point I actually looked at him. A tall, well spoken man begging for hundred naira early in the morning. I was confused.

Thankfully, the marwa filled up and the driver eased in and drove off.

 

The second encounter with him was in the afternoon. I was walking with my son. As we attempted to cross the road, he looked at my son and smiled at him.

“How are you? Hope you are taking care of mummy.”

“I am fine, thank you.” My son replied.

I immediately recognized him and I held tightly to my son as we crossed the road.

“Aunty, please I need just hundred naira.”

 

On my third encounter with him, I had stopped to buy suya from my regular customer. He walked up to me and said; “I thought you had a baby on your back. I didn’t realize it was your knapsack.”

He started with his compliments as usual and kept talking. I ignored him and faced my business. He asked for hundred naira and when he realized I wasn’t looking at him, he walked away.

The guy selling suya to me smiled and I asked if he knew him.

“Yes, I know am well well. He dey waka everywhere dey ask for hundred naira.”

“Ahn…ahn…” I lamented.

“I hear say na this street im papa house dey. Dem say after im papa die, na so he kolo.”

“Wow!!!” I exclaimed. “He no get family?”

“Dem say im brother just leave am for house. I hear say he don travel comot.”

I paid for my suya, thanked the guy and walked away.

 

Whether the story about his father dying, his brother travelling out and leaving him alone is true or not, I have no idea. But one thing is sure, the man needs help and it seems like he has been left to his fate.

—–

Photo Credit: http://www.chinalawandpolicy.com

The troubled N100 note

“I cannot collect this 100 naira. Please change it for me.” The lady said.

“I no get another one.”

“Please change it. No one will collect it from me.”

“I say I no get another one. Dem go collect am no worry. Wón ti cancel 100 naira, kò sí mó ní ta.” (The 100 naira has been cancelled. It is no longer available). The marwa driver said to the lady impatiently.

The lady refused to budge as she pointed the dirty, torn and cello-taped 100 naira to the driver.

“Aunty, no waste my time nau. Abeg, get down make I dey go. Mo ní wón ti cancel 100 naira.” (I said they have cancelled the 100 naira). He repeated.

I looked at the lady refusing to collect the money and the other passenger (a lady also) seated beside her. The three of us burst out into laughter as if on cue. The elderly man seated gingerly beside the driver smiled. “Ta ló sö fún ë pé wón cancel e?” (Who told you it has been cancelled). He asked as he looked at him.

Kò sí n ta mó.” (It is no longer available). The driver replied.

Wön ò cancel è. Wön kò ò print è mó ni.” (It has not been cancelled. They have only stopped printing it).

“Aunty ë jò ó, ë jé, owó ni.” (Aunty, please eat it. It is money).

The other lady passenger and I looked at the lady still holding the money. We both had smirks on our faces.

“Oya give me 500, make I give you 600.” The driver eventually said.

The lady opened her bag, pulled out a 500 naira note and was given three 200 naira notes in return.

She eased out of the marwa and we continued our journey with the elderly man laughing at the driver as he repeated his statement about eating the money.

****

In recent times, with the unavailability of clean 100 naira notes, I have also had to avoid buying things that would make me receive the note. Most of the notes in circulation are in a sorry state and you begin to wonder as there are so many insinuations about the note.

Does anyone still have clean and new 100 naira notes in their possession? Do well to share 😉

—–

Photo Credit: http://www.naijaquest.com

Oshodi – For the brave-hearted only

During the era of the old Oshodi, I remember driving home from work one evening. It was about 7:30p.m. I had just driven out of Mafoluku area and turned into Lagos-Abeokuta Expressway when my car decided to die right at Bolade bus-stop on the fast lane.

Not now, I sighed. I knew what the problem was, I just needed to wait it out. My windows were always wound up almost to the top with a little space for air to come in; can’t be caught napping in Oshodi. All doors were always locked. If the central lock does not work, I take my time to lock all doors individually.

As I sat in the car, I looked into my rear view mirror intermittently and stayed conscious of my environment. Cars zoomed past as I waited for the engine to cool off. A few minutes into my wait, an area boy came towards the car and stood beside me. He tapped on my door. “Open the bonnet make I help you check am.” He said in his croaky voice.

“Thank you.” I replied through the wound-up window but I refused to pull the lever to open the bonnet. I ain’t letting any area boy touch my car at this time of the night; I said to myself (especially as I was sure of what the problem was).

Soon, another area boy appeared by my right. He tried to open the passenger door and realized it was locked. “Open the door, make we help you push am comot for road.” I looked to the left and to the right; an area boy on each side. I began to pray in my heart that the engine would cool off on time. There were no street lights and the only source of light was from cars passing by.

“Open this door, ah…ahn, abi you want make I break your side mirror?” The guy by the driver’s side said as he tried to open my door.

I turned the ignition and the engine roared to life all of a sudden. The guy beside me realizing what had just happened made an attempt to pull my side mirror. I swerved the car to his side, he jumped back and I immediately swerved to the right towards the other guy before zooming off. As the car screeched and raised some dust in the air, I drove off heaving a sigh of relief and saying a silent thank you to God.

Oshodi – A place in Lagos where your courage is tested.

——

Photo Credit: https://www.adromeda.com.ng

Wedding Chronicles – The Last Bride

The church hall was filled with various colourful headgears representing various families.

The nine brides stood by their grooms; an expectant look on their faces. Each bride and groom had a chief bridesmaid and a best man standing behind them. The minister looked at them. “This is to the grooms. Please face your bride and repeat after me. I…..”

“I…..” The grooms chorused.

“Mention your names.” The minister continued. “Do take you, please mention your bride’s name – to be my lawful wedded wife, to have and to hold, to love and to cherish, from this day forward, till death do us part and according to God’s law. This I solemnly vow.” The grooms repeated.

The church gave a round of applause as the minister repeated the same vows to the brides.

The tenth bride put her hands under her veil and dabbed her eyes incessantly. She was the only bride still facing the minister while the others faced their grooms. Even though the air-conditioner was blowing at full blast, her palms were wet with sweat. She moved the bouquet of flowers in her hands from the right to the left and turned to look at the door every minute. Her chief bridesmaid fanned her vigorously when she noticed the beads of sweat on her head. She heard only half of what the minister said. Her mind was in turmoil. She was barely listening when she noticed that the grooms were about unveiling their brides. Tears gathered in her eyes and she bit her lip to stop them from spilling.

 

Two of the grooms’ friends stood outside the church gate while another stood just outside the church hall. The men at the gate fidgeted as they strained their necks and scrutinized every motor bike that passed by. Where could he be? They asked each other every minute. There were no mobile phones and they had no idea where or how to look for him. If they decided to make the journey to his house, they were sure not to meet him at home. It was definite he would be on his way but what could have taken him so long to get to the church when he knew what time the church service was meant to start. Their friend who stood outside the hall monitored the church proceedings. He gasped and put his hand on his head. The minister had declared the newest couples and was about to show them to the whole church.

Just then, the groom ran into the church hall with his best man in tow. He hurriedly unveiled his wife and put the ring on her finger. The minister smiled as he asked the ten couples to face the church and declared them the newest couples in town.

——–

Photo Credit: https://www.123rf.com

Blind Pact – Chapter 13

Gboyega wakes up with a start. Kofo is still asleep sprawled over his bare body. He shuts his eyes and the event of the night flashes in his mind. His heart cries out to God for forgiveness. Once again, he had allowed himself to be used to fulfill Kofo’s desires. The cry of his heart is deep and intense and it consumes his whole being.

He lifts his head and looks at Kofo’s face. Her jaw is set even in her sleep. He lifts her gently off his body. He stands up from the bed to pick up his underwear and clothes which are strewn all over the room from the night’s encounter. He dresses up quickly and quietly. The keys to his room lie on the floor beside the chaise lounge. It had been released from Kofo’s bosom when he tore her underwear away. He picks up both keys, slings the travel bag he had packed the night before over his shoulders and opens the door quietly. He walks briskly into the early morning dew. His wrist watch tells him that it is a quarter to 5.00am. He has nowhere to go as he has not figured it out yet. But what he is sure of, is that he wants to be far away from Kofo.

He walks to the bus-stop as the early risers make their preparations for the day’s business. He begins to weigh his options of a temporary abode. A colleague of his and also a youth corper lived alone with her younger sister. Their parents were hardly at home as they travelled constantly. She had once invited him over to her house but he had taken a rain check. Her home would have been a comfortable option for him but right now, he was finding it difficult to trust any other woman besides Bola.

Another friend of his comes to mind. He lived in a self-contained apartment just like his on the other side of town. They had both graduated from the same university but from different departments. They had met at the orientation camp and had hooked up immediately. He thought of putting a call to him as he looked at his wrist watch. It was 5.30a.m. He knew it was quite early to ring someone on a Sunday morning but there were no other options.

His friend picks up the call after the fourth ring. “Hello.” He answers half-awake.

“Good morning Tosan. I’m sorry I woke you up.”

“What’s up, Gboyega?”

“I need a favour.” Gboyega prays in his heart that his request will not be denied.

“Okay?”

“Can I bunk up with you for a few days?” He really had no idea how long it will take before Kofo got tired and left his room. He hoped it will be sooner than later.

“It’s fine but is there a problem at your end?”

“Yeah, something of the sort.”

“Okay. I’m home. You can come over.” Tosan concludes.

“Thanks a lot, Tosan. I should be there in less than an hour.”

His well thought out plan gives him renewed energy. He would stay with Tosan and go to work from there. It will cost him more in transportation but right now, he really did not care. If it meant taking rough and cheaper buses to work, he would. He knew there was no way Kofo would find him where he was. He only hoped she would tire out of the search for him quickly and return to Lagos.

**********

Kofo yawns as she stretches on the bed to feel Gboyega. She lifts her head a little when she realizes he is not on the bed. She checks the time on the wall clock in the room. It is 10.00a.m. She smiles broadly as she remembers the pleasurable night. Gboyega never failed to disappoint her and last night, he had possessed her with great force and renewed vigour. She knew it would only be a matter of time before he came lapping up to her because they belonged to each other. She runs her tongue over her lips as her body desires more of him. He had denied her for too long and she wanted to have him to her fill.

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She stands up to check on him in the bathroom when she notices that his clothes are no longer on the floor. She looks towards the reading table where his travel bag had been last night; it is no longer there. She hits her right hand on the bed in anger. Gboyega had left her again. Anger begins to boil within her chest. He couldn’t have gone back to Akure. He has to go to work. She makes a futile effort to calm down. She shakes her head. No, he is coming back. He won’t dare leave me alone again. She picks up her phone and rings her informant. She gives him details of what she needs. She steps into the bathroom and decides to fill up the bath tub with hot water. What she needs right now is to soak in a hot bath and be relaxed. Gbosgaga belonged to her. He will definitely be back.

********

For a whole week, Kofo waits patiently for Gboyega’s return. She shops for new clothing in town and also familiarizes herself with the city. She leaves his room every day returning late at night. She makes a few business contacts with politicians in the city and slowly begins to build a small cartel.

One of Gboyega’s neighbours notice her as she is about to drive out of the compound one late morning. He walks up to her. “Hi, you must be Gboyega’s girlfriend. My name is Zolch.” He says stretching forth his hand to take hers which were already on the wheel.

Kofo looks at him over the rim of the shades on her face. “Zolch?” She questions as she gives him her hand.

He kisses the back of her hand. “Yes, Zolch.” He laughs. “That is what most people call me”.

Kofo gives him a disdainful look. “Okay”. She replies as she starts the car.

“I was wondering, I have not seen Gboyega for a while.”

Kofo looks at him and fakes a smile. “He travelled out of town. He should be back soon.”

“Okay, say hi to him whenever he calls.”

“I will.” Kofo sneers as she drives off. She hisses as she rolls up her window.

Zolch looks at the tail lights of the car till it disappears. “Wow, what a catch?” He says to himself. “Na this kain babe I dey look for.”

 

Kofo moves out of Gboyega’s room the next week. After one week of waiting, it looked like Gboyega had fallen out of her grasp. She called her informant daily as she waited patiently for news from him. She needed to go back to Lagos as some of her clients had been calling her incessantly. Her job was suffering because of her continued stay in Shagamu and her clients were beginning to get upset with her. They were getting bored of some of the girls she had provided and were asking for fresh girls. She goes back to Lagos to face her business but she insists on her informant continuing his job until he hits gold.

 

Gboyega rings his neighbour from his hiding place three weeks after his absence. “Uzo, how far now? How you dey?”

“Hey, my guy. You don arrive?” Zolch answers.

“No, I neva come.”

“Where you come dey sins? I see your girlfriend. Chai! This guy, you get eyes for head oh.”

Gboyega is not amused. “Abeg, she still dey dia?”

“Hmm…e be like say I see her when she dey carry plenty bag comot your room last week.”

“You sure?”

“Ahn ahn, you dey run from her?”

“No. I just dey ask. You fit help me check to confirm?”

“Guy, this one wey you dey do confirmation for your girlfriend. She don carry belle for you?”

“No be like that. Abeg, just call me when you don confirm.” Gboyega says impatiently.

A few minutes later, Zolch rings Gboyega back. “I tell you say she don go but she no lock your door. E dey open.”

“No wahala. Thank you.” Gboyega says.

“If na me, I no go let that kain girl go oh. I go just die for the girl lap. Haba! See the kain car wey she dey drive. Her papa go get money. Na the kain thing I dey find be dat make I comot this poverty level.” Zolch rambles on.

Gboyega mumbles a reply and cuts the line. He breathes a sigh of relief. He had avoided telling Tosan his problem. He only told him that he had a visitor who came from Lagos for a programme and that he wanted her to have some privacy. He told him that the programme should not take more than two weeks. He was delighted to have his room back as he thanked Tosan profusely and apologized for the inconvenience.

It was time to go back home.

——
Photo Credit: http://www.pinterest.com

Blind Pact – Chapter 9

Kofo eased into her car in anger. No one had ever crossed her path and gone scot free. Gboyega was crossing her path and he was doing it without giving a hoot. She had travelled out of the country for about three months and by the time she came back, so many things had changed. She tried ringing him but his number was unreachable. She began to wonder what the problem could be. Since he had graduated from school, going to campus to check on him had not been an option. She had never bothered to know where he lived. Their rendezvous had always been at places she chose. She got her informant to get her all the details she needed and she had been shocked to hear that Gboyega had dropped her for a school girl. What was he thinking? She made more inquiries and found out who the girl really was. A church girl. She had been surprised when she found out.

She smirked as she tapped the steering wheel. Gbosgaga, a Christian? She laughed derisively and shook her head as she thought about him. So far, he had been the only source of happiness in her life and she could not let him go. No, not now. Not ever. He was hers and hers alone. No one else could have him. She hoped Bola would heed to her threat to stay away. She had been nice to her when she visited her room. Her next encounter with her may not be pleasurable if she refused to keep her hands off Gbosgaga.

Her happiness started and ended with him and she was ready to go into the deep recesses of her heart to wake up her past life in a bid to hold on to him. Kofo grew up in one of the slums of Calabar with her prostitute mother. She never knew who her father was. Every night, her mother locked her up in her room while she went out for her business. Unknown to her mother, one of the neighbours in their face-to-face abode had made a spare key to their room. While her mother went out to service her clients, the man came in with the spare key and serviced himself with Kofo. He was a young man of about twenty-two who lived with his parents who were drunks. He had no source of living and he hung around the house every day making a nuisance of himself.

She was just eight when he initially forced himself on her. She had cried all through till morning. He had warned her never to mention it to anyone; as that would result in her death and that of her mother. She had been too scared to tell her mother and she lived with that fear until she ran away from home at the age of thirteen. At thirteen, she had become fully matured and well-rounded and could pass for a twenty-one year old. Even though, her mother did not lock her in any longer whenever she went for her business, her abuser still visited their room every night to fulfill his pleasure.

The night she ran away, the man had come into her mother’s room as usual but this time, he came with three of his friends. He had smiled wickedly as he caressed her body and told her she was going to enjoy this session specially. She nodded as her soul died that night. The men had been excited as they groped her. Her abuser had proudly told his friends that he was only giving them this opportunity as she solely belonged to him. He told them to take their turns as he was having her the whole night. He beat his chest as he told them that he had made Kofo capable of going many rounds. His friends had been a little envious and each of them had tried to woo her with sweet words.

The three friends got down on her; each unable to hold his urge. Every opening in her body became a tool of abuse. Her abuser stood by her watching his friends as he excited himself, caressing her bust and awaiting his turn. Kofo continued to endure the abuse waiting for the right time to strike. When she noticed that their pleasure was hitting a crescendo, in the heat of their passion, she pulled out the chopping knife she had kept under the single mattress in the room and sliced each one of them wherever she deemed fit. Shock registered on their faces and before they could get a hold of themselves, she hit the knife on the head of her main abuser, opened the door and bolted out.

She never went back home. She picked a top and a trouser spread on the line outside the house and ran as fast as her legs could carry her. The night was eerie and she was covered in its darkness. She had stolen a few cash from her mother’s underwear bag and as she got dressed in an uncompleted building, she hid the cash inside her brassiere. She took a bus to Lagos that night. She did not care where she was going. She just wanted to be far away from home. The bus was carrying goods but she had begged the driver to allow her ride with him to wherever he was going. She could barely stretch her limbs in the crammed bus but she hadn’t been bothered. As long as she left the city, she was ready to bear anything.

She had arrived in Lagos as a newbie to street life. She slept in parks with a jackknife in her pocket and used it freely on anyone who tried to take advantage of her. She was quickly noticed by the men of the underworld and they saw her as an asset. She was used as a bait to lure men before they were robbed and she got her share of every operation the men handled.

 

During one of their operations, she had pretended to be in distress and knocked continuously on the door of an apartment. A man asked who was at the door and she had answered that she needed help. The man had opened the door and her two-man gang had pushed the man inside holding a gun to his head. They asked the man to bring out every cash he had and also asked his wife to handover all her jewelry.

After robbing them, one of her gang members looked at the man’s daughter as he licked his lips. The girl was about Kofo’s age. He asked the girl to lead him to her room and her father knowing what was about to happen began to plead with him. The man pointed his gun at the girl’s father and told him to shut his mouth. The girl started crying as she was rough-handled by the gang member.

As he was about leaving for the girl’s room, Kofo called him and asked him not to touch her. He got angry and told Kofo that if she had allowed them to have their way with her, he wouldn’t have to look for pleasure somewhere else. If she would not allow them to touch her, then he could touch anyone he wished without her consent. The second gang-member laughed and told Kofo he was going to have his turn after his friend. Kofo warned them a second time to leave the girl alone as their mission was to rob and not to rape but the men only laughed her to scorn.

As one of the men carried the girl like a sack, she screamed and memories of Kofo’s past came rushing back to her. Kofo put her palms over her ears trying to block out the screams but they only grew louder. She opened her eyes and saw the girl’s parents sobbing. She became enraged and walked into the girl’s room. Her hands had been tied and they were raised above her head. Her legs were also tied to the sides of her bed post. Her night gown had been torn and it lay on the floor by the bed. She lay on the bed naked and helpless. Tears streamed down the girl’s cheeks and Kofo saw fear in her eyes. The men smiled when she walked in and urged her to watch and enjoy their romp. They were both half-naked.

As the first man moved towards the girl, she screamed again and he slapped her hard in the face. Kofo felt the sting of the slap on her own face. The man grabbed the girl by the neck and was about to force himself on her when Kofo pulled out her gun and shot both of them point blank in a fit of fury. She walked out of the house alone with their booty and decided she was through with men of the underworld.

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She moved on to become a pimp for politicians and this became the source of her wealth.

Gboyega had to come back to her. She did not care about his new love for Christianity. He belonged to her and she was going to have him back by all means.

——-
Photo Credit: http://www.123rf.com

Blind Pact – Chapter 8

Kofo had noticed him standing on the patio. She had watched him for about ten minutes before she decided to walk up to him. His frame had been her attraction. He had well-built, toned muscles and she was a sucker for such. She had thrown the party because she knew there would be an abundance of young men. She only needed to find the one she needed. Apart from her political associates at the party, most people did not know that she owned the house. The young men in the living room were all stoned. They were obviously not disciplined. She had scanned the house looking for someone of interest when she found him alone with a glass of wine in his hand. He was lost in thought as he looked at the lagoon.

When he looked at her, she almost felt him caressing her body with his look. She could see that he was bored but he refused to say so. He hadn’t even asked the school she attended when she talked about campus life. He was a mystery and she longed to unravel him. She noticed that he left before the party ended and this further piqued her interest. As she lay on her bed in the early hours of the morning, she took out her tablet, opened Facebook and searched him by his first name.

He had to be on Facebook. Most of the students she knew could not do without social media. If he was one of such, she knew she would find him. She imagined it could take some time before she found him but she was ready for the search. Luck however smiled on her as she saw a profile picture of him after scanning through about ten names. She clicked on his photos and heat flowed through her as she looked at a picture of him bare chested. She had to have him. He was what she wanted.

She picked up her phone and dialed his number. He picked up after three rings. “Hi.” She said almost in a whisper.

“Hello.”

“I guess you were really bored last night.”

“Who am I speaking with?” Gboyega asked.

“Kofo.”

“Oh, hi. I’m sorry I did not realize you were the one.”

Kofo smiled. “That means you did not bother to save my number.”

“I’m sorry. I would save it now. So what time did you leave the party?” Gboyega asked.

“Sometime this morning and I just decided to check up on you.”

“Thanks.”

Kofo made it a duty to call him every morning and evening. She was intent on getting under his skin pretty fast. Every night, she imagined what it would feel like to have him in her bed. She bought him expensive boxers, belts and wristwatches and had them delivered by courier to him in school. His roommates began to tease him about how sophisticated and wealthy his new catch was. It had only been two weeks ago he met her and she was already making an impression on him. He wondered how she was able to afford all the expensive gifts as a student. Her parents must be wealthy. He thought.

His birthday was a Saturday and he had nothing scheduled for the day. He had planned to just lie in bed and do nothing. His mum had called him as early as 6.00am to wish him happy birthday. His brothers and his father sent text messages and he acknowledged all. He was about to go back to sleep at about 7.00am when Kofo’s call came through. He picked up her call and was surprised when she wished him a happy birthday. “How did you know?” He asked.

“Let’s take it as my little secret.” She said laughing. “So, what are you doing today?”

“Nothing.”

“Nothing. No way! It’s your birthday and we have to celebrate it.” She said.

“I haven’t made any plans for the day.”

“Well, I have.”

“You did?”

“Yep! Meet me at the Red Inn at 10.00am.” She said.

“Okay?”

“It’s not nice to keep a lady waiting.”

“10 for 10.” Gboyega said before cutting the call.

 

As he got dressed, he wondered what Kofo had planned. They had met in Lagos and now she was asking him out in Akure. Did that mean she lived in Akure and just came to Lagos to attend the party just like he had? He put on a navy blue polo tee shirt she had bought for him recently. As he stepped out of campus and took a bus to the Red Inn, different thoughts filtered into his mind. “Who was Kofo?” He had asked about her school and she had said she attended a university abroad and was on holiday in Nigeria. He had grown fond of her over the last three weeks with her constant calls morning and night. She was the first voice he heard in the morning and also the last when he hit his bed. She spoke in soft whispers at night and he began to look forward to her calls. When he tried to call her, she always asked that he dropped the call, so she could do the calling.

He walked into the Red Inn at 9.55am. He was glad he was able to make it before 10.00am. He took a seat at a corner in the lounge and made sure he was positioned where he could see her when she walked in. At 10.00am on the dot, Kofo walked into the inn. She was looking prettier than she was the last time they met. Her weaves fell on her shoulders and she walked with majestic gait. She was wearing a plunging V-cut black short dress which hugged her body in all the right places and Gboyega couldn’t help being captivated by her beauty. The inn was quiet and empty, making it easy for Kofo to quickly spot him.

As she slid into the booth and sat beside him, she gave him a light kiss on his cheeks and wished him a happy birthday. “We should make today special.” She said smiling. “Let’s go order breakfast.”

She stood up and held his hand as she led him to the restaurant. As Gboyega walked behind her like a sheep led to a slaughter house, Kofo swayed her hips with every step she took causing blood to flow through Gboyega as his whole being warmed from looking at her backside. He looked away and tried to concentrate on the restaurant ahead. She was beginning to mess with his mind.

They served themselves from the buffet arrayed in the restaurant and Kofo made sure her fingers brushed Gboyega’s at intervals. She sat across him at the table and as she adjusted her dress to make herself comfortable, Gboyega could not help noticing her buxom bust which looked like they needed to be free from the bondage she put them. Kofo smiled as she caught Gboyega staring at her assets. Every move and every step she took had been intentional. And she was happy that her plan seemed to be working so far.

They made little talk as they ate breakfast, Kofo leaning over the table once to get crumbs of bread off Gboyega’s mouth. As she caressed his mouth with her fingers in a bid to take off the crumbs, her bust stared in his face. Gboyega knew he could not handle the gestures anymore and he struggled to keep his little member in check.

When they were through with breakfast, Kofo took Gboyega by the hand and led him towards the rooms. Gboyega followed quietly without saying a word. She pulled out a key card from her bag and stopped before a room. She inserted the card into the keyhole and the door opened. As she slid the card into its slot by the door, the lights and the air conditioning in the room powered on. Gboyega walked in, closed the door behind him and stood with his back to the door. Kofo dropped her handbag on the floor and as she moved towards him to kiss him, Gboyega pulled her close to him and ravaged her lips with a hungry passion. She had it coming and she savoured every bit of it returning passion for passion.

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Gboyega’s body was on fire and he hungered for a release of the tension already built by Kofo. But she was not ready to give in easily to him. She was determined to test his endurance. She undressed him slowly as she teased his body with her mouth, her body and her fingers. She caressed every part of his body causing him to shiver under her touch. Gboyega dropped her dress from her shoulders and he was surprised that she wore no underwear. Kofo continued to push him to the limit until he could no longer restrain the tension.

He dragged her by the waist as he moaned in ecstasy. Standing right there by the door, he lifted her off the floor easily and they gave themselves wholly to each other. When Gboyega had satisfied Kofo’s pleasures, he carried her in his arms and gently dropped her on the bed. She smiled as she looked at him. He had even been better than she had imagined. Gboyega sat on the chair opposite the bed and looked at her.

“I guess that was what you wanted.” Gboyega said.

“No.”

“So, what do you want?”

“I want you for keeps.”

“I can’t sustain you. That is obvious, right?” Gboyega said as he looked round the room.

“I don’t need you to. Come over here.” Kofo said as she tapped the bed.

Gboyega stood up but did not move. “So, what am I to you, then?”

Kofo tapped her forefinger on her nose. “Hmm….let’s just say, you are my boyfriend.”

“A boyfriend that cannot cater for the needs of his girl?” Gboyega asked raising a brow.

“You ask too many questions, Gboyega. I did not come all the way from Lagos to answer questions.” Kofo said as she stood up from the bed. She walked towards him and began to caress his body again, kissing him as she did. She was determined to reawaken his little member. In a few minutes, they became entwined in each other’s arms again; panting from another bout.

Kofo refused to let Gboyega out of her sight the whole day. She made him pleasure her again and again and Gboyega had been up to the task. She ordered room service and they stayed in each other’s arms. By evening, they were both worn out. Kofo dropped Gboyega on campus with her sports car and he officially became Kofo’s toy boy.

——

Photo Credit: http://www.pinterest.com

Blind Pact – Chapter 4

Gboyega looks on as Bola walks away. He had noticed her when she came into school as a fresher and he had felt there was something strange about her. He knew it was beyond being just a girl studying Civil Engineering. There was more to her and he had been curious to find out. He watched her from afar hoping to understand her peculiar personality. When he found out that her life revolved around school, fellowship and the hostel, he had smiled. One of those born-again chicks. They had always being a mystery to him. There was something about them that he just did not understand.

His parents were not religious. They attended church whenever they felt like it. And their kids, all seven boys always stayed away on such days. His parents were secondary school teachers who believed that as long as their kids were morally upright, they were fine. The boys however, all engaged in one vice or the other without the knowledge of their parents.

Two years ago, he lost them on a trip back from their hometown. They had travelled home to attend the burial of a family friend who had died of a heart failure. The bus conveying them had somersaulted a number of times after a burst tyre. The bus had been mangled and bodies were thrown out during the mishap. There were no survivors.

Gboyega suddenly became an orphan with six younger brothers to take care of. He tried to keep his brothers as one family but they all rebelled. Family members deserted them and life became tough. This further hardened the boys and the centre of their family could no longer hold. Each went his own way taking his destiny into his hands and struggling to chart the course of his life.

It had been a sober day for him during one of the crusades organized by a church close to his house. He had been loitering around thinking about what had become of his life and that of his siblings when he felt a strong urge to go into the crusade ground. He looked around and saw joy radiating as the people danced and worshipped God.

When the pastor started preaching, he looked around wondering if anyone had mentioned his travails to the pastor. The pastor kept on talking as if he was referring directly to him. He stood up in annoyance thinking someone was playing pranks on him. But as he was about to leave the crusade ground, right before his presence, he saw flashes of his life before him. He saw himself struggling in vain to come out of a dark pit. The pit was deep and hollow. He looked up and there was bright light at the top of the pit. He cried out but no one heard him. His voice bounced back to him in deafening echoes. All of a sudden, he started to sink. He stretched out his hand for a lifeline but there was nothing to hold on to. The more he struggled, the more he sank deeper. He was neck deep in the bog and was about to be enveloped in the darkness of the pit when he suddenly came to himself and realized that he was still standing in front of the crusade ground. He turned back and right there on his seat, he called on God to save him. He could not boast of his past and he was haunted daily by a past misdeed. He continuously prayed every day that God will forgive him for all the wrongs he had done in the past.

Gboyega becomes a regular in the fellowship longing to know more about God. His lifestyle changes and he garners a lot of whispers within campus. His close friends notice his turnaround and they are surprised. He moves close to Bola trying to learn more about God from her. When he is confused about a scripture, he calls on her to expatiate which she gladly does. At other times, she refers him to the pastor of the fellowship. His changed life has an effect on a few of his friends and some also turn a new leaf.

 

A few days to his graduation, Gboyega attends his last fellowship meeting. After the service, he walks up to Bola and asks if he can accompany her to her hostel.

“Okay.” She replies.

“I want to thank you for being a good friend and helping me in getting grounded in Christ.”

“Oh don’t mention. What are we friends for?”

Gboyega stops and holds Bola by the hand. “Bola, I want us to be more than friends.”

Bola looks at him confused. “I don’t understand.”

“I mean, am I allowed to date you?”

“Date me?” She looks at him, shock written on her face. “I see you as an elder brother.”

“But I am not.”

“I’m sorry Gboyega, I can’t date you.” Bola says as she starts walking ahead. She looks back at him. “Thanks for walking me to my hostel.”

Gboyega stands still at the spot where he had stopped Bola. She walks away without a second look at him. Their friendship had grown over the past months and he saw her beyond being friends. He had fallen in love with her. He had tried to lighten his proposition by telling her he wanted to date her. What he actually wanted was to spend a lifetime with her. But he had been unable to bring himself to tell her. She would have thought he had gone bonkers. She was so different. He had had his fair share of ladies in the past but Bola was nothing compared to them. He hadn’t planned on falling in love with her. But it had happened and he could not deny it. He was leaving school in a few days; and in about two months, he would be going for the compulsory National Youth Service. He did not want to leave without declaring his feelings for her.

As he turned to walk back to his hostel, he thought. “How am I supposed to tell that I love her if she won’t let me?”

**********

Bola walks into her room tired. Her room is empty. As usual, her roommates have gone for either a party or hangout. Sometimes, she wonders how she copes living with such roommates. They all lived for the moment. They knew Bola’s stance and tried as much as possible to respect her. One of them had actually confided in her once about changing her lifestyle. She said not having enough to spend had pushed her to hang out with the others. She wanted to be seen as one of the happening girls on campus. Bola had smiled and asked her if that was her main purpose in school. She had been sober but it had lasted only for a day. The next day, she was back in the company of the others. She did not want to be seen as a living the life of a bore.

Bola had gone straight from lectures to fellowship. She was hoping no one would try to make small talk with her as she sneaked away after the service was over. She was therefore surprised that Gboyega had still found her. His question about dating her had come as a shock. She was not interested in dating anyone much less someone she took as an elder brother. Yes, he was not her brother but he could pass for one. She had a lot ahead of her and a relationship was not part of what she saw right now. She pushes away thoughts of him and lies on her bed. In a few minutes, she drifts off into deep sleep.

 

Gboyega’s graduation day is here and he has no one to invite. He asks Bola if she would be his guest and she obliges. When it is time to take pictures, she looks around wondering where his family members are but sees no one. After the event, he asks her to walk with him to his hostel to pick his luggage. “How come no one came for your graduation? I thought you would have invited your family.” Bola asks.

“I don’t have a family.”

Bola stops short. A confused look on her face. “You don’t have a family? How is that possible?”

Gboyega smiles as he holds her hand so she can continue walking. “I lost my parents two years ago. We have been deserted by family. My six brothers all live their lives the way they deem fit.”

“I’m….I’m so sorry. I did not know that.” Bola says sadly.

“I know. I don’t like talking about my past.”

They walk silently for some minutes; each lost in his own thoughts. When they get to the boys hostel, Bola tells him she would rather wait outside. Gboyega nods and goes inside alone. A few minutes later, he emerges with two travel bags and a knapsack on his back. Bola asks if she can help him with his knapsack and he takes it off his back, balancing it squarely on hers. They proceed and walk towards the campus gate.

“Where is home?” Bola asks.

“Lagos.”

“Okay. And where were you were posted to?”

“I was posted to Ogun state.”

Bola smiles. “That’s nice. At least, you were not thrown into a bush where you would have to go in search of network to receive calls.”

“Does that mean I should expect your calls?”

“Would you rather I don’t call?” Bola teases.

“I would love to hear your voice every day and today’s pictures would remind me of you even when I am far away.”

Bola looks away. “Abeg, don’t start oh. What’s with all the ‘mushy mushy’ talk?”

“I meant what I said the last time and much more.” Gboyega stops walking.

Bola also stops and looks up at him. “And I also meant what I said as well. Sincerely, Gboyega, can we just remain friends and leave a relationship out of this?”

Gboyega shrugs. “Okay. If that’s how you want it.”

“Thank you.” Bola replies as they resume walking again.

They arrive at the garage some few minutes later and Gboyega loads his luggage into the next public bus on queue. Since it is going to take a while to fill up, Bola decides to hang around with him till the bus moves. They find a comfortable place to sit down and order two cold bottles of coke from a food vendor.

“So, I have never asked about your family as well?” Gboyega asks.

“I lost my dad two years ago as well. My family is just me and my mum. I am an only child.”

“I’m sorry about your dad.” Gboyega says looking at her. “What does it feel like to be an only child?”

Bola shrugs. “Sometimes, it feels lonely. No one to talk to or confide in. But mum tries her best to fill in the gap.” She says staring at the bottle of coke in her hand.

“I feel that way too sometimes. Lonely. Since my parents’ death, everything has been in disarray. My brothers don’t care about each other. I have tried to bring them together but nothing seems to work. I guess the rejection by family members worsened it. I once thought about ending it all….”

Bola raises up her head in shock.

“I was just tired. It was the same day I walked into a crusade ground and everything changed from then.” He says smiling.

“I’m glad that happened.”

“Me too.” Gboyega says as he holds her hand.

The bus fills up and Bola nudges him gently. “You should go now.”

Gboyega gets up still holding on to her hand. Bola becomes uncomfortable and tries to remove her hand from Gboyega’s hold. He looks at her straight in the eyes and smiles as he drops her hand gently.

They hand over their empty bottles to the food vendor and Gboyega takes his seat in front beside the driver. “I will miss you.” He says as Bola stands by his side.

Bola looks away and does not respond.

The bus drives off before Bola decides to leave for campus.

 

As she walks back to her hostel, she pulls out her copy of Gboyega’s graduation picture from an envelope. Even though he is smiling, his eyes are sad. She remembers what he said about his family and brothers. How sad that no family member had been there to share in his joy. She put the picture back into the envelope and sighs. At least, she had her mother, Gboyega had no one.

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Photo Credit: http://www.shutterstock.com

To Love and to Hold – Episode 31

The weekend passed by in a jiffy for Fadeke and she was back in the office on Monday. This time, she decided to take a look at the signage on the ground floor to know which organization was on the 5th floor. The Excellent Auditors, the signage read. “So could it mean we both work in the same building?” Even if they did, she wasn’t ready to find out. She walked straight into the elevator and pressed the 12th button. As far as she was concerned, Chinedu was a closed chapter in her life.

Chinedu resumed in his office an hour later with one mission on his mind; to find out if Fadeke worked in the building. He wasn’t sure of the floor she had taken the elevator from but he was going to find out nonetheless. He tried to remember the way she was dressed the previous night. She was wearing a grey pant suit and carried an ash coloured hand bag and a laptop bag. Did she have an ID card on? He closed his eyes and tried to think. He remembered seeing a green lanyard wound round her left hand; that could only mean one thing. She worked in the building. The green lanyard was the ID of the National bank on the 12th floor.

He had been transferred to Lagos two years ago and had worked in the building the last two years. He wondered how come their paths had never crossed. Maybe, she just got employed with the bank. He had a few friends who worked with the bank and they had gone for lunch together on occasions. He had looked for her for six years. He wasn’t going to let her slip away this time. For four years, he hadn’t been able to get over the pain. She had left without a word and had made no contact. He lost interest in other ladies and had diverted his whole attention to work. At a point, his mother had to step in. “You can’t remain single for life just because of Fadeke. Life goes on and you have to move beyond the past”. She had said. He tried dating two ladies when his mother would not let him be but the relationships never worked out. His attention was always divided. He was in a relationship presently and his mother was glad that this seemed to be working out. It was the longest he had had in the last twenty months. The previous ones hadn’t lasted beyond three months but this was in the fifth month. He would finally settle down with someone and his mother was glad. He was indifferent but he just wanted to make his mother happy. So he was trying his best to make the relationship work.

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He stood up from his desk as he dialed on his mobile phone.

“Wassup?”

“I need a favour”. Chinedu replied.

“Okay”.

“Does any Fadeke Peters work in your office?”

“Yep! Regional Key Accounts Manager”.

“Really?”

“Yeah. You know her?”

“Hmm…something like that”. Chinedu said.

His friend chuckled. “Or you want to know her? She’s a beautiful chic and mehn, guys here are falling over for her”.

Even after so many years, he had to admit that she was as beautiful as she was when she was younger.

“So?”

“No, I don’t want to know her in that sense. She looks familiar and I just wanted to confirm if she is the same person I know”. Chinedu replied.

“Oh okay. So are we meeting up today or you busy?”

He thought for a few seconds. “Nah, not today. I got a lot on my plate today”.

“No qualms. See ya”.

He walked back to his seat thinking. So she was the Regional Key Accounts Manager at the bank. He would have loved to ask more questions. If she was recently employed, what time she left the office daily, if he knew anything about her personal life, but his friend would have known that there was more to the questions. He would have to find out every other information himself.

As much as Fadeke tried, her mind was half at work. She had never taken note that Excellent Auditors had an office in the building. Even if she was aware, the last she knew, Chinedu was in the Abuja office. Had he been moved to Lagos? Seeing him had brought back painful memories but she just wanted to know. She willed her heart to be still and put in an extra effort into getting her job done for the day. Chinedu was history and he had to remain so. By 6.30p.m, she was picking her handbag and laptop and looking forward to an evening with Kike.

Chinedu sat in his car waiting. He had closed at 5.30p.m and had been sitting in the car the last one hour. He wasn’t sure how long he would have to wait but he wasn’t bothered about that. His girlfriend, Amara, had called about thirty minutes ago and he had told her he had issues to deal with in the office. This was one issue he had to sort out today.

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He was trying to recline his seat a little more when he saw her walking towards her car parked a few metres away. He dropped his face a few inches and tried to remain unseen. She dropped her laptop bag into the booth of the car and eased into the car with her handbag. He saw her pick up a blue tooth gadget and fixed it to her ear. She reversed the car and was out on the road. When he noticed she had gone a little distance, he started his car and followed her.

She drove into the expressway and was soon on the third mainland bridge. He kept a safe distance but made sure he did not lose sight of her. Traffic was light which was unusual for a Monday. They came off the bridge about ten minutes later and she faced the Gbagada axis turning in at Anthony Village.

He followed still.

She turned into an estate and honked at the front of a traffic barrier. He waited at the tail end of the street from where she had turned in and watched. The traffic barrier was lifted and she drove in. He wasn’t sure if he should follow. He was still undecided when he saw her honk again in front of a black gate. A young dark skinned man wearing a blue Jalabiya opened the gate and closed it after she drove in.

So that was where she stayed. He made a reverse back into the adjoining street and drove home.

***************************************************************************************

Chinedu closed a little earlier from work. He hadn’t been able to sleep all through the night. How he was going to accomplish his mission had been uppermost on his mind and that had kept him mostly awake. As he eased into his car and drove out of the car park, he said a little prayer in his heart that his action would not boomerang right in his face.

He got to the estate and honked in front of the traffic barrier. A man peeped out of a gate house and walked towards his side. He wound down the window.

“Madam Fadeke’s house”. He said.

The man walked back to the gate house and lifted the barrier.

As he drove into the close, he parked by the fence adjoining the house and the next to it. He opened the back door of his car and brought out a big box wrapped with purple ribbons. He walked towards the gate and tapped on it on getting there. The man in the Jalabiya opened a shutter on the gate and asked; “Yes?”

“I’d like to see madam”.

“Which madam?”

“Madam Fadeke”.

He eyed him. “She neva come back from work”.

“Can I drop something for her?”

“From where you dey come?”

“Na someone say make I drop this thing for her”. He lifted up the box for him to see.

“Okay. Wait, make I go ask Ma Win”. The man said as he pulled the shutter close.

“Ma Win?” He shrugged in confusion. Well, he was asked to wait; he definitely would. There was no turning back.

The man was back in a few minutes and he opened the gate for him. “Ma Win say make you enter”.

“Thank you”. Chinedu replied.

The house was a bungalow and it had beautiful shrubbery planted round it. He tapped on the door and it was opened by an elderly lady. She was wearing a pink boubou that was heavily embroidered.

“Good evening ma’am”.

She smiled. “Good evening. I’m told you have a package for Fadeke”.

“Yes ma’am”.

“Can I receive it or will it be too heavy for me to carry?” Ma Win asked.

Chinedu smiled. “I would rather carry it in myself and not put you through the trouble.”

She stepped aside. “Please come in”.

“Thank you”.

He walked into the living room and smiled. The whole room was filled with touches of green and purple. He noticed some toys to one end of the room and wondered about them.

“You can drop the box in that corner”. She pointed to a section beside the toys.

He dropped it carefully.

“So who should I tell her this is from?”

“Erm…erm…actually it is from me”. He stammered.

“From you?”

“Yes ma’am”.

She looked at him carefully. “Sit down”.

He did as she bade.

“Who are you?”

He sighed. This was a story he had not had to relay in years.

———

Photo Credit: http://www.gettyimages.com