Monthly Archives: October 2017

The Hospital Visit

Tosin looked at his wristwatch. It read 9.45pm. He stood up and stretched. “Good night.” He said to his colleague sitting in the cubicle next to him.

“Good night.” Bayo replied.

 

As Tosin drove home, he touched the right side of his head. He had a pounding headache. He knew he needed to go to the hospital as the headache had been persistent for the past three days.

I will go tomorrow; he thought.

He got to his estate in about thirty minutes and honked for the security guard to open the gate.

He hardly acknowledged the greeting of the security guard. It was his usual way.

He took out his keys and opened the door to his flat. He dropped his laptop bag on the centre table and slumped into the couch.

He put on the TV and watched the moving images; his mind shutting down slowly.

 

********

Bayo resumed at his desk at 8.00am the next morning. Tosin was not at his desk and he wondered why as he always came in very early. Maybe he was running late; he thought.

By 11.00am, Tosin hadn’t arrived in the office but Bayo was so engrossed in his job that he hardly noticed. Their Head of department was on vacation and apart from Bayo, no one noticed Tosin’s absence.

At 10.00pm, Bayo looked at his wrist watch and noticed Tosin’s desk was empty. He realized he hadn’t put a call to Tosin all day to find out why he wasn’t at work. He picked up his phone to call Tosin, but the number was switched off. Hmmm….strange; he thought as he packed up his laptop and prepared to go home.

 

The next morning, Bayo resumed at work and met Tosin’s desk empty again. Something is wrong; he thought. He tried to call Tosin’s number  again but it was still switched off. He decided to close early so he could stop by at his house on his way home. He tried to remember the direction to Tosin’s house as he had been there just once. He was sure no other person in the organization knew Tosin’s house as Tosin hardly made friends. He couldn’t call himself Tosin’s friend, he was also just a colleague.

 

Bayo closed from the office at 6.00p.m. After a number of missed turns, he arrived at Tosin’s estate in an hour. The security guard queried him on his mission and he mentioned Tosin’s name. A call was placed to Tosin’s line but the response was still the same; the number was switched off.

Had anyone seen Tosin? Did he come out of his flat the previous day? Bayo began to ask questions but the security guard could not provide an answer. Tosin lived alone and hardly interacted with the other neighbours; the security guard told him.

Bayo asked the security guard to go with him to Tosin’s flat so they could see what the problem was. They banged on the door and pressed the door bell but there was no answer. They eventually got a carpenter to break open the door.

 

********

Tosin was lying down in the couch and was in his work clothes from two days ago. The TV was still showing images. Bayo called his colleague but there was no answer. He touched him and realized he was cold and stiff. Bayo noticed his mobile phone beside him and picked it up. It had been switched off.

No one had made an effort to check on him to find out why he had not gone out early to work as he usually did. No one had made an effort to find out why his car was parked for two days on a weekday. No one had an idea of what had taken place two nights ago when he came home.

 

As Tosin’s body was moved out of his flat, Bayo remembered Tosin had mentioned having a persistent headache which had refused to abate. Bayo had also been feeling tired of recent but had kept postponing his visit to the hospital. He left Tosin’s flat immediately and drove down to the hospital.

As the nurse checked his blood pressure, she had a grim expression on her face as she looked at him. “Hello sir, you need to slow down if you want to stay alive.”

——–

Photo Credit: http://www.mycity-web.com

THE AGE DRAMA

As the driver moved the bus forward, the conductor shouted his destination. Passengers at the bus stop flagged down the bus as they walked briskly towards it. The conductor tapped the bus asking the driver to pull to a stop to pick them up. Among the passengers about to embark was an elderly lady. As she was about to get into the bus, the conductor shouted; “Dúró, arúgbó ni o.” (Wait, she is an old woman).

The woman got into the bus, faced the conductor and asked; “Arúgbó báwò o? Mi ò kí n se arúgbó o. Mi ò tí ì pé 70.” (Old? I am not old. I am not yet 70).

I looked back to catch a glimpse of the old/young woman and she was an elderly woman even if she wanted to refuse the “old” tag.

This however, got me thinking.

When a child is born till the age of about three, the child’s age is calculated in months. You hear parents especially mothers say “Oh, she is 13 months or 18 months or 28 months. You hardly hear he is a year old or 2 years old. The child’s age is graded in months.

The child becomes a toddler and till the age of about 12, conversations on a child’s age graduates to; “He is 9 plus or 6 plus.” Plus becomes an additional appendage to the age at this time of the child’s life.

From about age 13 when the child becomes a teenager, the plus is dropped and the age becomes fast forwarded. So a 15 year old will probably tell you, he is sixteen even if he hasn’t had his 16th birthday. This happens till about the age of 40/45 when we want to feel older.

Fast forward to the age of 50 upwards, we don’t want to be seen as growing old. We want to be seen as still young and if possible compete with the younger generation. Our age becomes our actual age. No additions, no pluses.

I have always wondered why there is a bit of drama with our ages and the scenario in that danfo bus highlighted my thoughts again.

You think you have an idea or an explanation, drop them in the comments section and let us hear from you.

——

Photo Credit: http://www.playbuzz.com

The Cloak of Madness

Funmilade took out his keys from his pocket and opened the door to the flat he lived in with his mother. He sauntered in tired and collapsed on the single couch in the living room. It had been a long day and he was famished. He cradled a can of Bournvita in his arms and he used the key in his hand to open the can. Naira notes and coins stared at him. He shook the can and it rattled. He was shocked that a few people still spent the coins when most people had moved on from it. He dropped the can carefully by his side. Right now, he was hungry. He would come back to the can after his meal.

He walked into the kitchen and uncovered a pot of ila asepo. The aroma wafted into his nostrils and he took a deep breath. His stomach rumbled acknowledging its desire to be filled. He touched the pot and immediately retrieved his hand. It was still very hot. He looked to his right and noticed the brown cooler. He opened it and whistled as he saw two mounds of pounded yam neatly wrapped. He took out the bigger one, scooped out some soup into a bowl and settled down on a stool right there in the kitchen.

He knew he should wait for his mother to arrive as they always had lunch together whenever he came back from school but he was so hungry and he had to break the tradition today. He gulped down a cup of water after his meal, washed the plates and placed them carefully on the kitchen zinc.

He went back to the living room to attend to the can he had previously abandoned as a result of hunger. He picked out the money, straightened them out and counted them. It was five hundred and thirty-five naira. Fifteen naira out of that amount was in coins. Not bad; he thought. In a few minutes, the events of the day wore him out coupled with the heavy meal and he began to doze off.

**********

Iya Funmi opened the door with her key and walked in. She knew her son would be back from school waiting for her, so they could have lunch together. As she placed her bag on the centre table in the living room, the sight before her shocked her. She looked at her son but he was unrecognizable. She immediately ran out and started shouting as she placed her hands on her head. “Ará àdúgbò, ë gbà mí o” (Neighbours, please save me). Very soon, she began to draw the attention of her neighbours who lived in the other flats. They came out and began to ask each other what the problem was. When no one could answer the other, one of the men looked at Iya Funmi who was already seated on the floor and crying.

“Wetin happen, Iya Funmi.” The man asked.

“Na my pikin oh. Àwön tí n wón sá tèlé mi ti mú ömö mi o.” (Those running after me have taken hold of my child). The man looked around at the faces of the other neighbours and someone interpreted Iya Funmi’s lamentation to him.

“Oya make we go inside go see her pikin.” The man said. The others looked at each other but no one made a move. “Make we go inside nau.” The man repeated.

“Dey go for front. We go dey your back.” One of the women answered.

Another man stepped out of the crowd and the two men entered Iya Funmi’s flat.

They walked in to see Funmilade sleeping peacefully. He was however dressed in a torn tee shirt which had been previously white. He had his jeans trousers rolled up to his knee on one leg while the other was rolled down. He wore a white pair of socks which looked new on the leg with the roll up. He wore two different types of sneakers. One was green while the other was red. His face was also painted with make-up which looked like the job of a child playing with crayons.

The men stood at a distance and called his name. “Funmilade, Funmilade.” When he did not answer, one of them saw a mop stick by the corner and stretched out his hand to hit Funmilade on his leg.

 

Funmilade woke up with a start. He looked at the men before him and wondered why they stared at him like he was a clown. He heard voices outside and also heard his mother crying. Why was his mother crying? He thought. He stood up and the men retreated immediately.

“Ahn, ahn….Chigozie, IK, why you dey run?”

“U no mad?” Chigozie asked.

“Mad ke? Which kain question be dat?” Funmilade looked at them confused.

“Your mama say u don mad.” Ikechukwu said.

“Me mad?” Funmilade asked. He looked at himself and it suddenly dawned on him. Funmilade burst out into laughter and this further confused the two young men. They looked at each other and both of them ran outside.

The neighbours who were waiting for the outcome of their visit all scattered and ran in various directions when they saw the two men emerge in a run. Funmilade walked out and all the neighbours peeped from their hiding places to catch a glimpse of him.

Iya Funmi who was still seated on the floor and crying looked at her son. “Ah…ah, Funmilade, ta ni mo sè?” (Who have I offended?)

“Màámi, mi ò ya wèrè.” (My mother, I am not mad).

“Ah…ah…” Iya Funmi shook her feet and banged her hand on her laps as she lamented.

“Màámi, è dìde n’lè. Mo ní mi ò ya wèrè.” (My mother, get up from the ground. I said I am not mad).

Funmilade removed the tee shirt and began to clean the make-up on his face. He rolled down one leg of his jeans and removed his sneakers. “Màámi, rag day là n se ní school.”

Iya Funmi who had stopped crying and was watching her son while he was getting himself cleaned up looked at him. “Rag day?”

“Ni wón wá ní pé kë múra bíi wèré.” (And you were asked to dress like a mad man?)

“Rárá, Màámi.” (No, my mother).

Iya Funmi stood up and held her son as she turned him to the left and to the right scrutinizing him like a newly acquired product. “Funmilade, o ò ya wèrè?” (You are not mad?)

“Mi ò ya wèrè, Màámi.” (I am not mad, my mother).

“Ömö mì ò ya wèrè o. Jésù o sé o.” (My son is not mad oh. Thanks be to Jesus). Iya Funmi raised her voice as she began to dance to an imaginary tune.

The peeping neighbours all began to step out one by one. “Funmilade, you no mad?” “Wetin be rag day?” “So una dey pretend to be mad people for una school?” “Which kain madness thing una unifasity students dey do sef?” Questions flew from the left and the right.

Iya Funmi looked at her only son again as she wiped her tears and held his hand. She thanked her neighbours for their concern and walked into her flat with him right behind her.

“Rag day. Rag day.” She continued to say as she shook her head.

——

Photo Credit: http://www.pinterest.com

Mothering 101

Scenario 1

I was driving at 20km on the untarred and bumpy street. Rows of shops lined the street all the way down to my children’s school. I maneuvered the car carefully taking note of the fact that it was a street plied mostly by children walking to school. Rows of shops lined the right and the left of the street; most of them selling biscuits and sweets making them readily available for children on their way to school.

Suddenly, a little boy, probably aged three, ran out of one of the shops on my right. I slammed on the brakes and came to an abrupt stop. The little boy unaware that he had run right into the front of my car and narrowly escaped an accident, continued to play and run around as if nothing was amiss. A guy walking past, looked towards the row of shops and shouted. “Who get this pikin?”

His mother who was probably too busy to notice what had happened heard the question and ran out of her shop. She carried the boy and spanked his bum. The boy burst into tears immediately as she pushed him into her shop.

The guy who had witnessed the whole scenario said as he walked past my car; “Na so Yoruba people dey do. Dem no go take care of their pikin.”

I looked at him immediately and corrected the notion. “I am Yoruba and I take care of my children.” I faced the woman and said to her. “Kíni ë wá n na ömö yën fún (Why are you spanking the child?). Tó bá jé pé ë mó jú to ni, ë ò ní jé kí n wón ma sòrò sí wa (If only you had watched over your child, we would not have been insulted).

Did she care about what I said? I have no idea and did not wait to get a response from her as I drove off immediately.

 

Scenario 2

I was walking on a relatively busy street early in the morning. Even though, cars were not speeding by, the road was curved and most cars had to honk to notify other cars coming in the opposite direction. There were cars parked on the left and on the right of the street and this further hampered the line of vision of both the driver and the pedestrian.  A car was coming down my way on the right while some men sat under a shed on my left.

“Ë dúró sí bè. Ë má ì tíì lö.” (Wait there. Don’t go yet). I heard them call out to my right.

I looked to my right and saw two little children walking very close to the gutter. The girl could not have been more than four or five and she held her little brother’s hand who looked too young to be in school. They both wore uniforms, had knapsacks on their backs and held lunch boxes.

The car drove past and the men called out to them. “Óya, ë lè ma lö. Ibè yën ni ke ti rìn o. Ë má rìn ní títì.” (You can go now. Walk on that path. Don’t walk on the street).

As I walked past the men, I overheard them discussing about how a mother would leave such little children to walk to school alone. I shook my head as I walked away.

Was the guy in scenario 1 right to have said it was a Yoruba thing? Or are women now so confident to believe children at that age can take care of themselves? Or is education playing a factor in parental care?

My fellow Yoruba mothers, have your say. To the Igbo and Hausa mothers; have you also experienced this? I would like to hear from all.

——–

Photo Credit: http://www.pinterest.com

Love, Lies and Murder – Part 3

The secret affair between Taiwo and Mojirayo continued; both of them taking pleasure in themselves anytime Kehinde stepped out of the house. Mojirayo continued to fulfil her wifely duties to Baba Ibeji even though she still generated sneers from her co-wives. Taiwo and Kehinde gained admission some months after into the Lagos State Polytechnic to read Agricultural Technology and Marketing respectively. Baba Ibeji insisted he wanted them close by; therefore staying in the hostel on campus was out of the question. Taiwo smiled sheepishly on hearing his father’s instruction. As long as he went to school from home, he had unfettered access to Mojirayo. Due to the difference in their courses and lecture timing, Taiwo took full advantage of the situation and left the campus premises most times without his brother.

About eight months into their secret relationship, Mojirayo realized she had missed her period for two consecutive months and was beginning to feel sick. She had not been consistent with her birth control pills for a while and it dawned on her that she might be pregnant. She became confused as to who the father of her unborn baby was. Was it Baba Ibeji or Taiwo? She tried to do a calculation backwards to deduce who she had laid with during her most fertile period. Her mother had taught her how to check her fertile period, ensure she laid with her husband during the season and note down the date in a diary. By her calculations, she realized Taiwo could be the father of her baby. The thought gave her mixed feelings and she became more confused. She was carrying a baby for her husband’s son. She sighed as she began to think of a plan.

Taiwo came in early from school as usual. He went into his room, dropped his knapsack on his bed and faced Mojirayo’s room. He eased himself quietly into her room without knocking on the door. Mojirayo was about getting dressed when Taiwo grabbed the dress and held it away from her.

“Not so fast.” He said as he encircled his arms around her waist.

Mojirayo smiled but snatched her dress back from Taiwo. “We need to talk.” She said as she wore her dress.

Taiwo shrugged. “What’s there to talk about?” He asked smiling.

“This is serious, Taiwo. I am not joking.”

Taiwo noticed the change in her countenance and sat on her bed. “What is wrong?”

“I’m pregnant.”

“You are what?” Taiwo shouted as he stood up from her bed.

“You heard me Taiwo. I said I am pregnant.”

“So why are you telling me? Shouldn’t you be giving the news to Baba Ibeji?”

Mojirayo sighed as she blew air through her mouth. “I don’t think Baba Ibeji is the father.”

Taiwo guffawed as he looked at Mojirayo. “So who is the father?”

“You are.” Mojirayo said as she eyed Taiwo.

“You can’t be serious. No, this is a very expensive joke.” Taiwo said shaking his head as he paced round the room.

“Taiwo, do I look like I’m joking?”

“I’m not ready to be a father. Besides, you are my father’s wife.”

“Really? You didn’t think about that when you were sleeping with me.” Mojirayo said with sarcasm as she rolled her eyes.

Taiwo breathed deeply as he sat on her bed. “Okay, let’s think about this clearly. I know we are both upset. What can we do about it?”

********

Kehinde sauntered into the house tired. He went into his room and dumped his knapsack on his bed. He went to the next room to check on Taiwo and found out he wasn’t there. He wondered where he could be as he had told him he was going home. He however, noticed the knapsack on the bed. Maybe he has gone out again; he thought. He was about going to the kitchen to look for something to eat when he heard voices emanating from Mojirayo’s room. Could Baba Ibeji be back so early? He tiptoed towards Mojirayo’s room and realized he could hear a man’s voice. As he moved closer, the man’s voice became clearer and it dawned on him that it was Taiwo talking. What was he doing in Mojirayo’s room? He was about to place his hand on the door handle when he heard….

“Baba Ibeji is ready to be a father. I would tell him I am pregnant so that he thinks the child is his.”

“You will pass my child over to Baba Ibeji?” Taiwo asked.

“I thought you just said you were not ready to be a father.”

“Fine, fine. But this remains a secret between us. It must never be heard by a third party.” Taiwo warned.

“I know. Has anyone found out about us up till now?” Mojirayo sneered.

“Okay.” Taiwo said as he stood up. “I need to go to my room before the house gets full.”

Kehinde slipped away quietly towards his room. What had he just heard? Mojirayo pregnant for Taiwo? How come? Was that the reason why he never stayed back in school and was always in a hurry to go home? How long had this been going on and he never knew? He shook his head as he thought about his twin brother. Was he seduced? He remembered how much Taiwo fought for Mojirayo whenever her co-wives treated her harshly. So this was the reason? He thought about what he could do. Should he tell Baba Ibeji the truth? Mojirayo was a traitor and needed to be treated as such. He sat down on his bed and thought of a plan. Mojirayo needed to be exposed.

The next day, Kehinde told his brother he wasn’t feeling well. He told him he would not be able to make it to school and would like to rest at home. Taiwo nodded as he left the house. Immediately he stepped out, Kehinde went to Mojirayo’s room and knocked on the door. Mojirayo was surprised as she wondered who could be at the door. She knew Taiwo should have left for school. Besides, he no longer knocked on her door. She opened the door and saw Kehinde standing before her.

“Yes, Kehinde. Is there a problem?”

“Yes, there is.” Kehinde said. “Can I come in?”

“Erm….can we talk about it here or maybe in the living room? I will meet you there.” Mojirayo replied.

“It won’t take long. I promise.”

“Okay.” Mojirayo said as she stood at the door.

“I can’t talk while standing here. If it was Taiwo, you would have quickly welcomed him in with open arms.”

Mojirayo looked to the left and to the right of the hall to be sure no one was around or heard Kehinde’s statement. She stepped back immediately and let Kehinde in.

“What do you want?” She asked once Kehinde was in her room.

“You.” Kehinde smiled sheepishly as he rubbed his palms together.

“I don’t understand what you are saying.”

“Okay. Let me put it in a way you will understand. I know you are pregnant and that Taiwo is responsible. I know your plans to pass the baby off as Baba Ibeji’s. Are you following?” He asked with a wicked grin on his face.

Mojirayo looked at him without a word.

“So, if you want me to keep my mouth shut, you would play ball with me. I want to have a taste of what Taiwo has been eating.”

“You are mad. Do you realize I am your father’s wife?”

Kehinde burst out into hysterical laughter.

Mojirayo walked towards the door and shouted. “Get out of my room.”

Kehinde continued to laugh as he walked towards the door. “I will leave you to think about it. You know the way to my room when you are ready; or else, this night, Baba Ibeji would hear the truth.” He said as he slid his palm on her cheek and walked out of her room.

Mojirayo slapped his hand away and slammed the door behind him. She began pacing her room in anger. How dare he threaten her? What rubbish? She took a deep breath as she tried to calm herself down. She had heard that getting upset hurt the baby. She sat down on her bed as she thought of what to do.

A few minutes later, Mojirayo took out her phone from her beside drawer and dialed Taiwo. He picked up on the first ring. “Please come home earlier than usual today.”

“Why? What is wrong?” Taiwo asked.

“It is urgent.”

“Just give me an idea of what it is. Is it about the baby?”

“Yes, something like that.” Mojirayo said.

“Okay, I’ll be home soon.” Taiwo replied as he packed up his books and put them into his knapsack. He left the campus in a hurry, wondering what could be wrong with Mojirayo’s baby.

He got home, dropped his knapsack in his room and quickly walked down to Mojirayo’s room. He made a mental note to check on Kehinde later.

Mojirayo was lying on her bed when Taiwo walked in. She stood up immediately to hug Taiwo and he noticed she had been crying.

“What’s wrong?” Taiwo said as he searched her face. “Is anything wrong with the baby?”

Mojirayo shook her head as she sniffed.

“So why are you crying?”

“Kehinde threatened to tell Baba Ibeji the truth. He must have heard our discussion yesterday. He says I must sleep with him to keep him quiet.”

“What?” Taiwo shouted. “He said that?”

“Yes. He said he is waiting for me in his room once I make up my mind.”

“No!!!” Taiwo shouted in anger. He opened the door of Mojirayo’s room and stormed towards Kehinde’s room.

Mojirayo ran after him as she tried in vain to calm him down. “Taiwo, wait.” But Taiwo was already in front of Kehinde’s door.

********

Kehinde had headphones over his ears as he listened to music from his phone. His eyes were closed and he did not see Taiwo storm into his room. Taiwo yanked off the wrapper he had used to cover himself and realized Kehinde was stark naked. For a brief second, Taiwo was shocked. Kehinde removed the headphones and looked at Taiwo in anger.

“What is the meaning of this?” Kehinde shouted.

Taiwo threw the wrapper back at him so he could cover his nakedness. “So you were truly waiting for Mojirayo to warm your bed?”

Kehinde wrapped his lower body as he sneered. “Haven’t you been enjoying it so far? What is wrong with me having a share of it? I’m sure she would even enjoy me better.”

In an instant, Taiwo’s fist landed on Kehinde’s face and he staggered backward. Kehinde put his palm on his face, brought it to his eye-level and saw blood. His nose was bleeding. He lurched forward to hit Taiwo as Mojirayo screamed. Taiwo was faster and moved away just before Kehinde’s fist landed. Kehinde punched the wall and his hand started bleeding as well. Taiwo hit his brother in the stomach and Kehinde doubled over. Mojirayo stood as she shook wondering what she should do. Should she run out and call the neighbours? Or should she leave them alone to themselves? She was confused.

Taiwo was gaining the upper hand as they both rolled on the floor. Taiwo sat on his brother and squeezed his neck. Kehinde struggled as he tried to push his brother off him. He flailed his hands but Taiwo squeezed his neck even tighter in anger. All of a sudden, Kehinde became still and stop struggling. Mojirayo was the first to notice and she tried to pull Taiwo off his brother. Taiwo still held his brother’s neck and Mojirayo started hitting Taiwo asking him to get off Kehinde. The expression on her face was that of fright and shock as she bent down to place her hand on Kehinde’s chest. Taiwo was still fuming and heaving and Mojirayo had to call his attention. Taiwo’s countenance changed when he saw the look on Mojirayo’s face. He knelt down and tapped his brother as he called his name.

“Get up Kehinde.”

Kehinde was still and Taiwo held his hand up. Kehinde’s hand fell back on its own accord.

“Stop this. It is not funny.” Taiwo said as he shook his brother. “Kehinde, I said get up.” He said; his voice becoming a little shaky.

“He’s not breathing.” Mojirayo said as tears streamed down her cheeks.

Taiwo fell on his haunches as he looked up with a blank stare. “What have I done?” He soliloquized.

Voices began to emanate from downstairs. Taiwo and Mojirayo looked at each other. Mojirayo’s co-wives were beginning to arrive from their shops to prepare lunch for the younger kids. Taiwo put his two hands on his head. Mojirayo folded her palms under her chin as she looked around in confusion. She saw a bottle of beer sticking out from under Kehinde’s bed. She took it and looked away as she hit the bottle on the wall. It splintered and she put it in Kehinde’s limp hand. She tore the dress she was wearing at the bust and started screaming. Taiwo looked at her confused. Has she gone mad? What was she doing?

Mojirayo’s screams generated commotion downstairs and everyone ran upstairs towards Kehinde’s room. As the women burst into the room and saw Kehinde on the floor, they looked at Taiwo’s face and saw Mojirayo crying and struggling to cover up her bust. Kehinde’s mother screamed as she knelt down and lifted up her son. “Kehinde, Kehinde?” She shouted. “What did you do to my son, you wicked girl?”

“He tried to rape me.” Mojirayo said as she cried uncontrollably. “He dragged me from my room, tore my dress and tried to rape me. He also wanted to stab me with the broken bottle in his hand, so I pushed him and he fell down and didn’t stand up again.” She said all in one breath.

Taiwo was astonished. His mother looked at his face as if to confirm the story and he nodded his head. He was at a loss. His tongue was tied and he just continued to nod his head. Iya Kehinde broke out into another scream as she lamented.

The other wives shooed the younger children who were standing by the door back to the living room. The oldest wife spat towards Mojirayo’s direction while the younger wife cursed the day Baba Ibeji brought Mojirayo into their house. As the oldest wife walked out of the room, she took out her mobile phone from her waist pouch and placed a call to Baba Ibeji to find out if he was almost home. He confirmed in the affirmative. She told him to come with the police and gave him details of all that had happened. Baba Ibeji could not believe his ears. He asked his driver to move faster so he could get home on time.

********

Baba Ibeji walked into his house and met Mojirayo seated on the floor in the living room. She was still in her torn dress and everyone stayed away from her like a plague. He looked at her and asked her to tell her story. The oldest wife stood up in anger. “Baba Ibeji, so you think I would lie against her?”

“Woman, sit down.” Baba Ibeji shouted.

“Kehinde did not go to school today. He said he wasn’t feeling fine. After everyone left the house, he came to my room and wanted to sleep with me. I told him I am his father’s wife and he can’t do that.”

Baba Ibeji nodded.

“When he refused to listen to me, I told him I would call you and report him to you. He got angry and tore my dress.” Mojirayo said as she released her hand from her dress and her bust became exposed. “He dragged me to his room, locked the door and undressed. When I tried to open the door to run out, he broke a beer bottle and wanted to stab me with it. I was afraid so I pushed him. He fell down and didn’t stand up again.”

Baba Ibeji took a deep breath, closed his eyes and bent his head backwards.

“Baba Ibeji, what are you waiting for? Call the police to get this wretched woman out of our house.” Iya Kehinde shouted. “I regret the day you brought her into this house. Ah, Baba Ibeji, you have killed my son. You have killed my Kehinde.”

“Enough.” Baba Ibeji shouted her down.

“Hmm….mmmmm.” Iya Kehinde hummed and cried as she shook her feet impatiently.

Baba Ibeji called Taiwo and asked him to go down the road to call the police to make an arrest. Thereafter, he placed a call to Mojirayo’s parents to come urgently. Mojirayo’s parents arrived in a jiffy thinking there was another gift to be received. They got to Baba Ibeji’s house and noticed the tense atmosphere. They met Taiwo outside and asked him what the problem was. Taiwo pointed into the house without a word. Everything that had happened still looked like a dream to him. Mojirayo was carrying his baby. Baba Ibeji was still unaware of Mojirayo’s situation and now she was getting arrested.

He still could not comprehend the motive behind Mojirayo’s lies. Would Mojirayo reveal that she was pregnant or would she decide to terminate the pregnancy? If she decided to have the baby, what was the future of the unborn baby in detention? Would they ever find out that Mojirayo was arrested for a crime he committed?

Photo Credit: http://www.123rf.com

—————————————————- THE END ——————————————————